Does WIC Cover Lactose Free Milk

WIC, or the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, aims to support the nutritional needs of low-income families. One common question is whether WIC covers lactose-free milk. The answer is yes, WIC does usually provide lactose-free milk for participants who have a medical need for it. Lactose intolerance is a condition where the body cannot digest lactose, a sugar found in milk. WIC recognizes lactose intolerance as a medical condition and provides lactose-free milk as part of its food package to help participants meet their nutritional needs. To qualify for lactose-free milk through WIC, participants must have a medical diagnosis of lactose intolerance from a healthcare provider.

WIC Eligibility and Benefits

The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) is a government program that provides food and nutrition support to low-income pregnant, postpartum, and breastfeeding women, as well as infants and children under the age of 5. WIC provides a variety of foods to participants, including:

  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Whole grains
  • Dairy products
  • Lean protein

The specific foods that are available through WIC vary by state, but all states must provide certain core foods, including milk.

Does WIC Cover Lactose-Free Milk?

Lactose-free milk is a type of milk that has had the lactose sugar removed. Lactose is a natural sugar found in milk and dairy products, and it can cause digestive problems, such as gas, bloating, and diarrhea, for people who are lactose intolerant.

WIC does not cover lactose-free milk as a core food. However, some states do offer lactose-free milk as an optional food. To find out if your state offers lactose-free milk through WIC, you can contact your local WIC clinic.

WIC Eligibility

To be eligible for WIC, you must meet the following criteria:

  • Be a pregnant, postpartum, or breastfeeding woman
  • Be an infant or child under the age of 5
  • Have a household income that is at or below 185% of the federal poverty level

You can apply for WIC at your local health department or WIC clinic. You will need to provide proof of income, proof of identity, and proof of residency.

WIC Benefits

WIC provides a variety of benefits to participants, including:

  • Free or low-cost healthy foods
  • Nutrition education and counseling
  • Referrals to other social services

WIC can help you and your family eat healthy and stay healthy.

WIC Benefits
BenefitDescription
Free or low-cost healthy foodsWIC provides a variety of healthy foods to participants, including fruits, vegetables, whole grains, dairy products, and lean protein.
Nutrition education and counselingWIC provides nutrition education and counseling to participants to help them make healthy eating choices.
Referrals to other social servicesWIC can refer participants to other social services, such as housing assistance, job training, and childcare.

What Foods WIC Covers

The WIC program provides a variety of foods to low-income pregnant, postpartum, and breastfeeding women, as well as infants and children up to age 5. These foods are designed to help families meet their nutritional needs and improve the health of mothers and babies.

The following is a list of foods that WIC covers:

  • Milk
  • Cheese
  • Yogurt
  • Eggs
  • Beans
  • Lentils
  • Soy
  • Meat
  • Fish
  • Poultry
  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Whole grains

In addition to these foods, WIC also provides vouchers for fruits and vegetables to participants who live in areas with limited access to fresh produce.

FoodWIC Coverage
Milk1 gallon per week for pregnant and postpartum women, 2 gallons per week for breastfeeding women, 1 quart per week for children ages 1-2, 2 quarts per week for children ages 3-5
Cheese2 ounces per day for pregnant and postpartum women, 3 ounces per day for breastfeeding women, 1 ounce per day for children ages 1-2, 2 ounces per day for children ages 3-5
Yogurt1 cup per day for pregnant and postpartum women, 2 cups per day for breastfeeding women, 1 cup per day for children ages 1-2, 2 cups per day for children ages 3-5
Eggs1 dozen per week for pregnant and postpartum women, 2 dozen per week for breastfeeding women, 1 dozen per week for children ages 1-2, 2 dozen per week for children ages 3-5
Beans1 pound per week for pregnant and postpartum women, 2 pounds per week for breastfeeding women, 1 pound per week for children ages 1-2, 2 pounds per week for children ages 3-5
Lentils1 pound per week for pregnant and postpartum women, 2 pounds per week for breastfeeding women, 1 pound per week for children ages 1-2, 2 pounds per week for children ages 3-5
Soy1 pound per week for pregnant and postpartum women, 2 pounds per week for breastfeeding women, 1 pound per week for children ages 1-2, 2 pounds per week for children ages 3-5
Meat4 ounces per day for pregnant and postpartum women, 6 ounces per day for breastfeeding women, 2 ounces per day for children ages 1-2, 3 ounces per day for children ages 3-5
Fish8 ounces per week for pregnant and postpartum women, 12 ounces per week for breastfeeding women, 4 ounces per week for children ages 1-2, 6 ounces per week for children ages 3-5
Poultry4 ounces per day for pregnant and postpartum women, 6 ounces per day for breastfeeding women, 2 ounces per day for children ages 1-2, 3 ounces per day for children ages 3-5
Fruits2 cups per day for pregnant and postpartum women, 3 cups per day for breastfeeding women, 1 cup per day for children ages 1-2, 2 cups per day for children ages 3-5
Vegetables3 cups per day for pregnant and postpartum women, 4 cups per day for breastfeeding women, 1 cup per day for children ages 1-2, 2 cups per day for children ages 3-5
Whole grains2 ounces per day for pregnant and postpartum women, 3 ounces per day for breastfeeding women, 1 ounce per day for children ages 1-2, 2 ounces per day for children ages 3-5

Dairy and Milk Options under WIC

The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) is a federal nutrition program that provides healthy food to low-income pregnant, postpartum, and breastfeeding women, and to infants and children under five.

Dairy products are an important part of a healthy diet, and WIC provides a variety of dairy options to participants. These options include:

Milk

  • Whole milk
  • Reduced-fat milk
  • Fat-free milk
  • Lactose-free milk

WIC participants can choose any type of milk that they prefer. However, it is important to note that lactose-free milk is not available in all WIC clinics.

Other Dairy Products

  • Cheese
  • Yogurt
  • Cottage cheese

WIC participants can also choose from a variety of other dairy products. These products are a good source of calcium, protein, and other nutrients.

Dairy ProductServing SizeCalcium (mg)Protein (g)
Milk, whole1 cup3068
Milk, reduced-fat1 cup3068
Milk, fat-free1 cup3068
Lactose-free milk1 cup3068
Cheese, cheddar1 ounce2007
Yogurt, plain1 cup41512
Cottage cheese1/2 cup14014

Special Dietary Needs and WIC

The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) is a federally funded program that provides nutrition assistance to low-income pregnant, breastfeeding, and postpartum women, infants, and children up to age 5. WIC provides a variety of foods and nutrition education to help participants meet their nutritional needs.

WIC covers a variety of special dietary needs, including lactose intolerance. Lactose intolerance is a condition in which the body does not produce enough of the enzyme lactase, which is needed to digest lactose, the sugar found in milk and other dairy products. Lactose intolerance can cause symptoms such as gas, bloating, diarrhea, and abdominal pain.

WIC Benefits for Lactose Intolerance

  • WIC provides lactose-free milk to participants who are lactose intolerant.
  • Lactose-free milk is available in a variety of forms, including whole milk, low-fat milk, and skim milk.
  • Participants must have a medical diagnosis of lactose intolerance to receive lactose-free milk from WIC.

Table of Lactose-Free Milk Products Covered by WIC

ProductAmountFrequency
Lactose-free milk (whole milk, low-fat milk, skim milk)16 fluid ounces per dayAs needed

WIC participants who are lactose intolerant should talk to their WIC nutritionist about how to get lactose-free milk through the program.

Well, there you have it, folks! I hope this article has shed some light on whether WIC covers lactose-free milk and all the details that come with it. Remember, every WIC program is different, so it’s always best to reach out to your local office for the most accurate information. Thanks for reading, and be sure to stop by again for more insightful articles on all things WIC!