Can You Use WIC Card Out Of State

Typically, Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) cards are designed for use within the state where they were issued. However, there may be exceptions or flexibility in some circumstances. If you move out of state or need to use your WIC benefits temporarily in another state, it’s advisable to contact your local WIC agency or the WIC agency in the state you’re visiting. They can provide guidance on whether you can use your card out of state and assist you with any necessary arrangements or procedures. It’s important to note that policies and regulations regarding WIC card usage can vary from state to state, so it’s crucial to check with the relevant authorities for the most accurate and up-to-date information.

WIC Card Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible for the WIC program, you must meet the following requirements:

  • Be a pregnant woman, a breastfeeding woman, or a child under the age of 5.
  • Meet the income guidelines established by the USDA.
  • Live in the state where you apply for WIC benefits.
  • Be a U.S. citizen, a legal permanent resident, or a non-citizen who meets certain eligibility criteria.

To determine your income eligibility, the WIC program uses the following income guidelines:

Household SizeMaximum Monthly Income
1$1,750
2$2,347
3$2,944
4$3,541
Each additional person$597

If you meet all of the above eligibility requirements, you can apply for WIC benefits by contacting your local WIC agency.

Can You Use WIC Card Out Of State

The WIC program is a federal program that provides nutrition assistance to women,
infants, and children. WIC benefits can be used to purchase healthy foods such as fruits,
vegetables, whole grains, and milk. WIC cards are typically issued in the state
where the WIC benefits are being received, as a result whether you can use your
WIC card out of state depends on the state where you are trying to use it.

Out-of-State WIC Card Useage Restricions

  • Some states do not allow WIC cards to be used out of state at all.
  • Other states allow WIC cards to be used out of state for a limited time, such as
    30 days.
  • A few states allow WIC cards to be used out of state indefinitely, as long as the
    cardholder meets certain eligibility requirements.

If you are planning to use your WIC card out of state, it is important to check with the
WIC office in the state where you will be using it to see if there are any restrictions.
You can also use the WIC website to find a WIC office near you.

WIC Card Out-of-State Use
StateOut-of-State WIC Card Use
AlaskaAllowed for up to 30 days
ArizonaAllowed for up to 30 days
ArkansasAllowed for up to 30 days
ColoradoAllowed indefinitely
ConnecticutAllowed for up to 30 days
DelawareAllowed for up to 30 days
FloridaNot allowed
GeorgiaAllowed for up to 30 days
Hawai’iAllowed indefinitely
IdahoAllowed for up to 30 days

The WIC program is a federal nutrition program that provides food assistance to low-income pregnant, postpartum, and breastfeeding women, as well as infants and children under the age of 5. WIC benefits can be used to purchase a variety of nutritious foods, including fruits, vegetables, milk, cheese, eggs, and whole grains.

Inter-State Transferring of WIC Benefits

In general, WIC benefits cannot be used outside of the state in which they were issued. However, there are some exceptions to this rule. WIC benefits can be transferred to another state if:

  • The participant is moving to another state permanently.
  • The participant is traveling to another state for a temporary period of time, such as for a job or for medical care.
  • The participant is a member of the military and is being deployed to another state.

To transfer WIC benefits to another state, the participant must contact their local WIC agency and request a transfer. The WIC agency will then work with the WIC agency in the new state to transfer the benefits.

It is important to note that the transfer of WIC benefits may take some time. Therefore, it is important to start the process as early as possible before the participant moves or travels to another state.

Reason for TransferRequired Documentation
Permanent MoveProof of new address in the new state
Temporary TravelProof of travel plans
Military DeploymentMilitary orders

## Can You Use WIC Card Out Of State?

The WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) program provides food assistance to low-income pregnant women, new mothers, and children under the age of 5. WIC cards are used to purchase eligible food items at authorized grocery stores and farmers’ markets.

**Generally, WIC cards cannot be used out of state.** This is because WIC is a state-funded program, and each state has its own eligibility requirements and vendor network. Using a WIC card out of state could result in penalties or the card being blocked.

### Consequences of Using WIC Card Out of State

* **Your card may be blocked.** If you use your WIC card out of state, the system may flag your account as fraudulent and block your card.
* **You may be fined.** Some states have laws that prohibit using WIC cards out of state, and you may be subject to fines or other penalties if you violate these laws.
* **You may have to pay back the money.** If you use your WIC card to purchase ineligible items or use it fraudulently, you may be required to pay back the money to the state.

### Avoid Using WIC Card Out of State

It is important to avoid using your WIC card out of state to prevent any potential consequences. If you need to travel out of state for an extended period, you should contact your local WIC office to discuss your options. They may be able to issue you a temporary card that you can use out of state.

### Table: WIC Eligibility Requirements by State

| State | Income Limit | Age Limit |
|—|—|—|
| Alabama | 185% of Federal Poverty Level (FPL) | 0-5 years |
| Alaska | 200% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Arizona | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Arkansas | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| California | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Colorado | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Connecticut | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Delaware | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| District of Columbia | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Florida | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Georgia | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Hawaii | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Idaho | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Illinois | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Indiana | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Iowa | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Kansas | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Kentucky | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Louisiana | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Maine | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Maryland | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Massachusetts | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Michigan | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Minnesota | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Missouri | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Montana | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Nebraska | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Nevada | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| New Hampshire | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| New Jersey | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| New Mexico | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| New York | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| North Carolina | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| North Dakota | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Ohio | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Oklahoma | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Oregon | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Pennsylvania | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Rhode Island | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| South Carolina | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| South Dakota | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Tennessee | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Texas | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Utah | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Vermont | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Virginia | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Washington | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| West Virginia | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Wisconsin | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |
| Wyoming | 185% of FPL | 0-5 years |

**Note:** Income limits are subject to change. Please contact your local WIC office for the most up-to-date information.
Alright folks, that’s all for now! Remember, if your WIC card’s ever giving you grief out of state, don’t hesitate to reach out to your local agency or the USDA for assistance. Thanks for sticking with me through this info-packed journey. Keep stayin’ informed and make sure to pop back in for more food-related wisdom. Take care and happy healthy eating!